AirFit F20: How to measure your ideal mask size at home

During the Coronavirus situation, we’re all helping to stop the spread by staying at home. But if you’re about to start therapy or curious about a new mask and aren’t able to visit a CPAP store, how will you know which size mask is right for you?

Luckily, it’s easy to find the correct mask size from the comfort of your own home!

Finding the perfect fit is all about a CPAP mask that’s most comfortable for your facial features and personal sleep style. A perfect fit is also key to your CPAP therapy success. That’s why we used input from hundreds of CPAP users with a wide range of facial features to design AirFit F20.

The result is a mask that fits nearly everyone and has become one of the most widely used CPAP masks in the world.

How to determine the right size for an AirFit F20 mask:

Option 1) Measure your face using a ruler or tape measure   *recommended method*

To determine the correct mask size for your facial structure, we recommend taking exact measurements using the method described below. This is the most accurate way to determine your correct size.

  1. Find a ruler or measuring tape at home. When measuring, please try to use a rigid measuring tool and measure in a straight line up and down.
  2. Measure from the bridge of your nose to the indent on your chin (just below your bottom lip). It may be helpful to have a friend assist you. *See fig. 1 below. You should be measuring from the height of the bridge of your nose (which his usually just below your eye line) down to the indent in your chin.
  3. Match your measurement with the given sizes below to find the correct sizing for you.

Option 2)  Measure your face using a printed sizing template

If you don’t have a ruler or tape measure, we’ve created a printable sizing template you can use at home. Here’s how to use the printable sizing template:

  1. Access the ‘AirFit F20 Fitting Template’ PDF
  2. Open the file. Print the file at home. It doesn’t need to be in color – black and white is fine.
  3. After printing the template, get a pair of scissors and cut out along the dotted line. Once cut, the template should look like the one below. *See fig. 2 below.
  4. Align the arrow on the sizing guide to the bridge of your nose. *See fig. 2 below.
  5. Select the most appropriate size by referring to the area of the guide just below your bottom lip, in the indent on your chin.

And that’s it! Now you know which size to request from your CPAP equipment provider. If you continue to have mask comfort issues, you should work with your respiratory therapist and CPAP equipment store once the self-isolation recommendations have been lifted.

This blog post contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. The views expressed on this blog and website have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, practice, or other institution with which the authors are affiliated and do not directly reflect the views of ResMed or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates

AirFit N20: How to measure your ideal mask size at home

During the Coronavirus situation, we’re all helping to stop the spread by staying at home. But if you’re about to start therapy or curious about a new mask and aren’t able to visit a CPAP store, how will you know which size mask is right for you?

Luckily, it’s easy to find the correct mask size from the comfort of your own home.

Because everyone’s face is unique, it’s important to choose based on your facial features. And with so many CPAP mask designs to choose from, it can be hard to know which ones will fit yours. That’s what makes AirFit N20 and its 99% fit range so incredible. It’s been tested on CPAP users from around the world, with a wide range of facial features, and has proven to fit nearly everyone.1

How to determine the right size for an AirFit N20 mask:

Option 1) Measure your face using a ruler or tape measure *preferred method*

To determine the correct mask size for your facial structure, we recommend taking exact measurements using the method described below. This is the most accurate way to determine your correct size.

  1. Find a ruler or measuring tape at home. When measuring, please try to use a rigid measuring tool and measure in a straight line horizontally (left to right).
  2. Measure from the outside of your nose on the left to the outside of your nose on the right. It may be helpful to have a friend assist you. *See fig. 1 below. You should be measuring the width of your nose, from the two farthest points on your face.
  3. Match your measurement with the given sizes below to find the correct sizing for you.

To determine the correct mask size for your facial structure (if you do not own a ruler or tape measure), please use the method described below.

  1. Access the ‘AirFit N20 Fitting Template’ PDF
  2. Open the file. Print the file at home. It doesn’t need to be in color – black and white is fine.
  3. When the template is printed, get a pair of scissors and cut out along the dotted line. Once cut, the template should look like the one below. *See fig. 2 below.
  4. Align the sizing guide under the nose, so that the flares of both nostrils are between the appropriate sizing indent. *See fig. 2 below.

**In the figure below, the patient measures as a Large. However, if you think you are in between sizes (i.e. Small and Medium), we recommend going with the larger size as it will be more comfortable for you!

And that’s it! Now you know which size to request from your CPAP equipment provider. If you continue to have mask comfort issues, you should work with your respiratory therapist and CPAP equipment store once the self-isolation recommendations have been lifted.

This blog post contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. The views expressed on this blog and website have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, practice, or other institution with which the authors are affiliated and do not directly reflect the views of ResMed or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates

7 Common CPAP mask problems & how to solve them

If you have a CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) machine as a part of your sleep apnoea therapy, it goes without saying that you’ll get the most from your therapy by keeping it regular and consistent.

Consistency comes from using the machine during every sleep as instructed and keeping as close to a routine as is feasible. While a CPAP machine can offer relief and a better night’s sleep, it’s not without its minor challenges too. Most commonly, CPAP users can encounter issues with the mask. If you’re experiencing any issues with your mask, we’ve listed seven common concerns around CPAP masks, and how you can solve them, so you can focus on getting a great night’s rest.

The CPAP mask plays a major role in the functioning of the sleep apnoea machine, and as it is the only part of your therapy with direct contact to your skin, it is the one part that most people have questions about. Here, we look at all of the common mask problems and, more importantly, how to solve them so you can get the most out of your nightly treatment.

Do you have air leaking from your CPAP mask or your mouth?

Why CPAP-mask leak can be a problem.

  • Noise of air escaping from the mask can disturb your sleep and that of your partner.
  • Air escaping from the mask into the eyes can cause irritation, resulting in them becoming bloodshot swollen and dry.
  • The effectiveness of your therapy can be compromised if the leak is excessive, this is because the effective pressure to maintain your open airway will be lost as the air escapes around the mask or out through the mouth. This can cause breakthrough symptoms during the day such as increased tiredness and snoring at night.

Mask leak – Air leaks from the mask when the mask is not correctly fitted.

Insufficient cleaning could cause problems with your mask

  • This may be due to the headgear being adjusted incorrectly i.e. over-tightened or too loose.
  • Also frequent changes of position during the night may cause the mask to shift position and cause leakage.
  • Insufficient cleaning of the cushion of the mask retains facial oils on the cushion and as the pressure rises will cause the mask to lift off the face.
  • The age of the mask can affect its ability to seal well as over time the cushion may wear and the headgear lose its full elasticity.

Solving your mask leak

  • Check that your mask harness is not over-tightened. If this is too tight the air is unable to inflate the thin outer membrane of the mask. The temptation is always to tighten the mask when a leak occurs, however, this can be the cause of the problem.
  • Facial contours can change when we lie down and muscles can relax once we are asleep, so it is always best to adjust the mask while you are in your sleeping position.
  • The inflation of the dual wall of the cushion ensures that the mask remains in contact with the face, maintaining an effective seal as you move during the night.
  • Excessive mask leak and an inability to achieve a good seal is often the first clue that your cushion needs replacing. ResMed masks should last approximately one year if cared for correctly.
  • To get the optimal life from your mask, be sure to wash your face each night before putting on your mask and avoid using face creams just before bedtime. Wipe your cushion each morning with a warm damp flannel to remove any facial oils. At least once a week wash your mask thoroughly, using original washing up liquid and avoid using anything with perfumes, moisturisers, antibacterial agents, bleaches, etc. Rinse with fresh water and always dry your mask and cushion out of direct sunlight and not on a radiator.

Excessive mask leak and an inability to achieve a good seal is often the first clue that your cushion needs replacing.

Air leak from the mouth

  • Caused if nasal problems such as blocked sinuses, colds, allergies, deviated septum prevent adequate ventilation through the nose warranting sporadic or continuous mouth breathing. Patients who have had throat surgery for snoring in the past may also experience mouth breathing due to the changes in the anatomy of that area.
  • Mouth breathing often causes an excessive dry mouth and sore throat.

Problem solving your mask leak from the mouth

  • If you experience mouth breathing a full face mask will certainly work for you and would allow you the option of breathing through your nose and/or mouth.
  • If your mouth is excessively dry in the morning and your throat is frequently sore this is an indication that you are probably breathing through your mouth.
  • Patients who find it difficult to use a full face mask may find some benefit from use of a chin strap which helps to hold the lower jaw to remain closed, but a full face mask is the preferred option.

This blog post contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. The views expressed on this blog and website have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, practice, or other institution with which the authors are affiliated and do not directly reflect the views of ResMed or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates.